Top Menu

International Graduate Centre of Education

Knowledge Intersections II: Exploring the Research of Central Australia

Research Symposium

KnowledgeIntersections_FeaturedImage

KnowledgeIntersections-AStrangewaysLPapatraianou

Welcome

Al Strangeways and Lisa Papatraianou
Charles Darwin University

We are delighted that an excited conversation we had with Lisa Hall in May of 2017 resulted in the 2018 Knowledge Intersections II Symposium. Batchelor Institute held the first Knowledge Intersections Symposium in 2017 to enable researchers and others to make connections between their research projects and strengthen networks between central Australian researchers. The original concept of crossings or knowledge intersections originated with local Arrernte interpretation of the concept to mean two roads meeting neither blocking nor erasing the other. This stimulating one day event featured a range of presentations on research as art - art as research, and sustainability that highlighted the range of ways central Australian research converges and intersects across disciplines, cultures and contexts.

KnowledgeIntersections-JMiller

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION

Making a box to fit: from video ethnography to emergent-responsive practice in a remote Aboriginal community context

Jeanette Millier | Charles Darwin University

This presentation focuses on the emergent processes used that enabled me to collect authentic stories of how a group of remote Aboriginal families support the ‘growing up’ of their children. My purpose is to explore how I navigated the information gathering process whilst managing academic and community expectations. I provide an overview of the originally proposed approach and why it did not fit the context of the community in which I was researching. The mixed methods approach that emerged drew elements from a range of approaches including video ethnography, narrative methods and auto-ethnography.  This method allowed me to prioritise the Aboriginal families’ driving of the content and style of the research. The second part of this presentation details the challenges of this multi-faceted approach: managing the logistics of the research context and the personal challenges of making it work whilst maintaining a commitment to sustainable and ethical research that also met the expectations of the academy. I conclude by asserting that working across different cultures whilst honouring and embracing difference requires an approach that moves away from a set of rules and towards a mindset that involves constantly questioning assumptions from the individual self and the academy.

Rosalie Schultz | Flinders University

KnowledgeIntersections-RSchultz

Sustaining Aboriginal wellbeing through sustainable research

The Interplay research explored wellbeing for Aboriginal people in remote Australia, to guide services to better address wellbeing needs. As sustainable research, the project prioritised relationships and commitment to shared learning, with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers and Aboriginal community members collaborating throughout the research process. Caring for Country, cultural education across generations, and speaking Aboriginal languages emerged as aspects of sustainable wellbeing. Country has been shaped by the caring practices of thousands of generations of Aboriginal people, so biodiverse ecosystems that form the Country depend on human activities. Aboriginal languages enable communication about culture and Country; and embody and strengthen identity. They are needed to ensure that knowledge is sustained through generations. Australia has committed to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. These include universal goals and targets where recognition of Aboriginal people and their expertise may be critical, such as biodiversity conservation, gender and social equity and nutrition. The Interplay project showed how central Australian expertise can contribute to global sustainability; relationships and commitments from the research may ensure sustainable research processes. This presentation will address how sustainable research can contribute to the wellbeing of Aboriginal people, and support Australia’s progress towards global sustainable development goals.

John Guenther | Batchelor Institute

Erin Turner Mental | Health Association of Central Australia

Billie-Jo Wesley | Mental Health Association of Central Australia

KnowledgeIntersections-ETurner

KnowledgeIntersections-BWesley

Sustaining life and wellbeing: the ethics of suicide prevention research and evaluation

Suicide in Aboriginal communities has long been recognised as a serious concern. In Australia, suicide is the 10th most common reason for death among males, but in the Northern Territory, in many regions it ranks in the top four causes of death. Suicide Story is a suicide prevention and community capacity building program developed specifically with and for remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory. The program content was developed through the teachings and guidance of Aboriginal people and centres on the specificities of Aboriginal protocols and suicide. While the program has run now for more than five years in its current form and some data has been collected during this time, it has not been independently evaluated. MHACA has commissioned an evaluation to assess the program and inform its ongoing development. While the evaluation is still underway and we cannot report on outcomes, the purpose of this paper is to discuss ethical issues associated with evaluations of this kind, drawing from the experience of the evaluation and project team and our analysis of the literature on evaluated suicide prevention programs. We discuss how we have addressed these concerns in this evaluation, with suggestions for other researchers in this field.

Rosalind Beadle | University of Melbourne

KnowledgeIntersections-RBeadle

Achieving Sustainable outcomes through utilizing a collaborative approach in remote Indigenous research

This presentation shows how a collaborative ethnographic approach and participatory action research can produce meaningful and sustainable outcomes in a remote Indigenous context. The study involved cycles of action and reflection by a group of local people within their own project and immersion of the researcher through prolonged engagement. A group of Ngaanyatjarra women in Warburton, WA, initiated, developed and managed a series of activities to address wellbeing in their community. Central to this goal was a school breakfast program focused initially on the kids, but this expanded into a broader catering role and, in addition, mentoring local young girls and women in other communities. This led to the establishment of a worker role that was designed and enacted on the women’s terms and that was meaningful within the social and cultural contexts of their lives. Sustainable outcomes based on: (1) the research practice; (2) targeted activities initiated, developed and managed by the women; and (3), key dimensions of the women’s experience in their worker role, are considered and discussed.

Lisa Hall | Batchelor Institute

with Linda Anderson, Tarna Andrews, Fiona Gibson, Mona Kantawarra, Barbara Martin, Yamurna Oldfield and Carolyn Windy

KnowledgeIntersections-LisaHall

KnowledgeIntersections-Tarna Andrews

KnowledgeIntersections-Fiona Gibson

Embracing multiple outputs from Intercultural research projects with a view towards sustainability

The instinct and desire to undertake intercultural research that is ethical and responsible is something that must be taken seriously in doing research work in Central Australia. But what does it look and feel like in practice? Perhaps what we should be aiming for is research work that sustains all participants, both during the work itself and in an ongoing way afterwards. Truly ‘sustainable’ research needs to be responsive to the differing needs of the researchers and participants, to ensure that multiple needs are being met by the project. This paper will explore the development of the publication ‘We Always Stay’. This book was published as a sort of companion piece to a PhD thesis that explored the teacher stories of seven Aboriginal teachers from remote communities in Central Australia. While the focus of the thesis was to explore the supports and barriers for Aboriginal people in becoming qualified teachers, the intention of the book was always to celebrate the stories of the teachers and make these stories available to a wider audience. The book also honours the teachers themselves and provides them with a sense of well-being through the process of having told their story and having an audience listen to that. This paper will be presented by Lisa Hall, a non-Indigenous educator and researcher who undertook the PhD and two of the teacher participants, Linda Anderson and Fiona Gibson, who offered their stories to both the research and the book. Together we will talk about the process of bringing both of these projects to fruition and the interpersonal commitment and collaboration that ensured their success.

Deepika Mathur | Charles Darwin University

Rolf Gerritsen | Charles Darwin University

Bharanidharan Shanmugam| Charles Darwin University

Sami Azam | Charles Darwin University

Are university-industry collaborative projects sustainable in regional  towns?

For many years university-industry collaboration has been the focus of attention in Australia and internationally. The new Australian Government research funding arrangements are geared towards encouraging researchers to deepen engagement with industry and other end users by working together “to find solutions to real world problems and to create jobs and growth”. This paper uses the example of an Alice Springs-based university-industry collaborative project to argue that the institutional landscape of regional towns is very different from major cities.  It is critical to understand factors that can render such collaborative projects sustainable or unsustainable in regional towns. These factors can vary from the limited number of industry partners in regional towns, the transitory nature of businesses, the need for long term strategic partnerships, to intellectual property rights, timelines of research outcomes and the metrics for measuring the socio-economic impact of the research. The results are significant since most new research funding and initiatives are aimed to increase industry participation in research projects regardless of their location. This can place regional towns’ research projects at a disadvantage.

Zania Liddle | University of New England

KnowledgeIntersections-ZLiddle

Exploring the narratives of Aboriginal School teachers in remote schools to foster Aboriginal Education leadership

The lived experience of Aboriginal school leaders is an under-explored space in the generation of school leadership knowledge for remote contexts.  Exploring stories of leadership collected from Aboriginal practitioners in the field - focusing on the roles and responsibilities of school leaders together with the motivations behind their reasons for taking on a school leader position(s) - generate a narrative that foregrounds authentic themes about the key qualities and elements for effective Aboriginal leadership in remote school contexts.  Understanding of the key qualities and elements of school leadership from the perspectives of Aboriginal practitioners and exploration of the links to Aboriginal knowledge, culture and identity pinpoint what is needed for the next generation of Aboriginal school leaders to emerge.  This presentation explores how the researcher approached using her own stories of remote Aboriginal school leadership along with those of others, and the challenges and benefits of such an approach to generating authentic data of lived experience.

Matthew Campbell | Charles Darwin University

Vanessa Davis | Tangentyere Council Research Club

Denise Foster | Tangentyere Council Research Club

Isabelle Waters | Tangentyere Council Research Club

KnowledgeIntersections-MCampbell

KnowledgeIntersections-VDavis

Ethics knowledge making and sustainable research: learning with the story of the Tangentyere Research

This workshop focuses on exploring the challenges and opportunities that surround working with Aboriginal people as knowledge holders and researchers within projects in which Aboriginal perspectives are sought.  After an introduction that situates the discussion in the context of the experience of the Tangentyere Council Research Hub, participants of the workshop will be facilitated to discuss a) the benefits of working with Aboriginal researchers in Aboriginal research projects, both in terms of knowledge work in a formal sense and in terms of developing capacity around knowledge work that transforms the field over time; b) the challenges of such work for the different groups of participants involved in it; and c) strategies, experiences and ideas that support the addressing, overcoming or avoiding of such challenges.

Supriya Matthew | Charles Darwin University

Sustainable environment-health impact research in regional and remote towns

Extreme and poor environmental conditions such as extreme heat and poor air quality affect the health of people in both urban and remote areas. Majority of the studies that explore the impact of extreme weather or poor air quality rely on data from ground based monitoring stations and primary health data from hospitals. Primary health data usually in the form of ambulance call outs, emergency department presentations, hospital admissions usually only represent severe cases. A proportion of the community affected may be attending clinics of have just been affected mildly or are less verbal to their symptoms are not included. In remote towns, there is also usually very low resolution of ground based air quality or temperature monitoring systems. For instance, the nearest weather station for Alice Springs, which has a population close to 25,000 is almost 10km away from the town centre. Air quality monitoring is not conducted for Alice Springs. Increasing the resolution of ground based monitoring systems may not be cost effective for sparsely distributed remote and regional locations. Moreover, individual exposure to temperature vary with location, behavioural factors, household conditions and health conditions. This paper will focus on research required to promote on-going responses by community to mitigate the health risks due to extreme heat and air quality in Alice Springs. 

Judith Lovell | Charles Darwin University

Al Strangeways | Charles Darwin University

KnowledgeIntersections-JLovell

KnowledgeIntersections-AStrangeways

Monumental in a small-town way

If public art is ‘the placed material objects that are designed to carry the stories of a city’, what happens when the place isn’t a city, the ‘public’ is not a monolithic audience, and for many, the stories carried are not those the art was commissioned to carry?

This session illuminates a public engagement initiative that transformed how some of its audience engaged with a donated public artwork (2010) in Alice Springs. Installing a ‘founding father’-type statue (white man, gun in hand), without the ‘due process’ of the Public Arts Committee could be described as flaunting our region’s love of informality. The researchers subsequent engagement (2017) of a public audience initiated 20 arts-based responses to the man, story, and statue. With sound bites, their images tell of a public engagement initiative linking realist philosophy and arts processes, and a transformation of our understanding of evaluating public engagement initiatives.

Wendy Taleo | Charles Darwin University

Network narratives from The Alchemist's Lab to Monsters and beyond: a story of the potential of 'global contemporaneity'

The images and story of this presentation will lead you on a journey to understand how a global, transmedia project in digital material thinking (Rae, 2018) is informing local practice.   This presentation explores how the researcher worked collaboratively to create individual artefacts to be placed in a digital ‘museum’ space called The Alchemist’s Lab.  This created a  ‘choose your own adventure’ narrative which offered adventurers an inviting space to enter and create transformed local meanings that have the capacity to communicate with the local community.  It explores the potential of such a globally created and situated webspace to create a ‘3rd space’  of ‘global contemporaneity’ that supports the needs of locally situated individuals to create context-specific meanings and to share these multiple perspectives and meanings. It concludes with touching on the implications that the use of such transmedia (or media-jumping) modes can have for informing future education technology.

Iris Bendor | Central Australian Research Network

KnowledgeIntersections-IBendor

Okwui Enwezor and the end of modernism: re-positioning Australian Indigenous art in the contemporary art world

Until the end of the 20th century modernism was regarded as a Western phenomenon. The paradigm of contemporary art promoted the end of what Nigerian born curator Okwui Enwezor called Westernism, and instead emphasised the existence of Multiple Modernisms, and their transcultural aspects (McLean, 2016). Enwezor was the Art Director at Documenta 11 (2002), the first Documenta to have a non-European Director. His installation, All the World’s Futures was the central exhibition at the 2015 Venice Biennale. Enwezor emphasised art produced through widespread influences. In Venice, 21 artists were from African descent. This compared to 21 American artists in total in the exhibition. Enwezor also selected artworks by seven Australian artists including a piece by the late Indigenous artist Emily Kame Kngwarreye. The exhibition dealt with complex matters in a multifaceted way. Enwezor was not limited to artists alone in his process to build the installation; he also engaged philosophers, activists and other contributors in his project (Enwezor, 2014). Enwezor is renowned for successfully positioning artists from African countries in the contemporary art arena, and thus provides a possible model for Australian Indigenous art to be likewise positioned. The status of contemporary art from African countries early on, and its current achievements, may be used as a means of understanding aspects of Australian Indigenous art.


Lisa Papatraianou | Charles Darwin University

Al Strangeways| Charles Darwin University

KnowledgeIntersections-AStrangewaysLPapatraianou

Different places, different faces: an arts-based approach to understanding resilience in intercultural contexts

This presentation emerges from a study that aimed to understand the experiences of culturally diverse school students and explore how they consolidate their educational aspirations at the ‘cultural interface’. It identified the challenges and resources they encountered when negotiating different home and school cultures and the impact of resilience on helping them make successful life transitions. In this presentation, we explore the ways in which arts based methods enabled us to work sensitively and ethically in diverse intercultural settings to elicit participants’ ideas and emotions. Intercultural contexts are conceived of in two ways in this presentation. Firstly, we mean the two cultures that the students are moving between as they manage the difference between home and school, and the resilience resources they drew on to navigate the challenges they face. Secondly, we mean the diverse cultural groups of young people whose experiences we hoped to understand: Central Australian Indigenous school students, those with refugee backgrounds, and International students. This presentation focuses on the capacity of art making activities and modes to express potentially sensitive aspects of personal experience and challenge in these settings and with individuals from non-English language backgrounds. We will show the diversity of expression and the depths of experience that the arts can represent. Further, we will demonstrate how the arts enable participants to exercise agency in choosing how much to mask or limit when describing personal experiences which might otherwise open individuals to positions of vulnerability.

Cain Gilmour | Charles Darwin University

KnowledgeIntersections-CGilmour

Monsters and music: from technical to creative skill development in VET

This presentation explores how a collaborative Design Lab (DLab) approach can help develop new ways of working in Vocational Education Training (VET).  It describes the process by which the researcher, a VET music lecturer, worked with colleagues and the resources they offered to offer VET music students a learning experience that moved beyond technical, industry-focused training and helped develop creative and innovative thinking skills, skills that industry and society require to be developed by 21st Century learners.  The program developed as a result of a DLab collaboration that built on and developed a collection of resources produced in a Higher Education and research context.  These resources, primarily a collaborative monoprint titled ‘Monstrous Breeches’, but also a cartoon based on this called ‘Different Monsters’ were used to inspire several learning activities where students were asked to reflect on the monsters they saw in the artwork based on their own real-life experience, and then write an audio track that reflected their interpretation of the artwork.  The presentation reflects on the benefits of a DLab collaborative approach to engage lecturers in developing their teaching and reflective practice and open up new ways of thinking and working in the tightly structured VET space.  Such new ways of working are vital to future proof delivery concepts, strengthen VET delivery and sustain VET provision in a rapidly changing teaching landscape.

Samantha Disbray | Australian National University and CDU

Vivien Johnson | University of New South Wales

Charlotte Philipus | Tjupi Arts

Out of the darkeoom and into cyber space

The Northern Territory Bilingual Education Program operated in the Pintupi-Luritja region of Central Australia from 1978 to 2006. A Literature Production Centre at Papunya school was established to provide resources for the program. Over the years, dedicated Aboriginal literacy workers, illustrators, storytellers, elders and linguists combined their talents with printers, production managers and teacher-linguists in the creation of over 500 books, many newsletters and photographs, and stories and events captured on audio and video tapes. The material was systematically stored, manuscripts and masters, recorded voices and hand-drawn illustrations, alongside printed final products. The Bilingual Program closed in 2006 and most of the materials were boxed up and with five crowded filing cabinets, padlocked in the old darkroom of the Literature Production Centre. Our paper tells the story of this ambitious and creative undertaking, and the steps now being taken to bring this collection out the darkroom and into the digital era, providing local and global access and conservation for the future. The story is interwoven with another great story from Papunya school, birthplace of the contemporary Indigenous Art movement, as the two are intimately linked. We explore the multifaceted significance of the collection locally and nationally, and its contribution to art, literature, language, education and history.

The art work used for the Knowledge Intersections Research Symposium is by Kathleen Wallace and is titled “Grandmothers teaching grand-daughters” 2016, Lino Mono print (3/20).

Kathleen Wallace is an Eastern Arrernte custodian and artist with a 45 year+ career as a cultural expert and teacher. Her paintings are widely collected and when considered as one extensive body of work represent her homelands and the relationships of Eastern Arrernte to the sociocultural traditions and systems within those homelands.

PROUDLY SUPPORTED BY

Open all | Close all

Abstracts

Sustaining Aboriginal wellbeing through sustainable research

KnowledgeIntersections-RSchultz

Rosalie Schultz Flinders University

The Interplay research explored wellbeing for Aboriginal people in remote Australia, to guide services to better address wellbeing needs. As sustainable research, the project prioritised relationships and commitment to shared learning, with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers and Aboriginal community members collaborating throughout the research process. Caring for Country, cultural education across generations, and speaking Aboriginal languages emerged as aspects of sustainable wellbeing. Country has been shaped by the caring practices of thousands of generations of Aboriginal people, so biodiverse ecosystems that form the Country depend on human activities. Aboriginal languages enable communication about culture and Country; and embody and strengthen identity. They are needed to ensure that knowledge is sustained through generations. Australia has committed to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. These include universal goals and targets where recognition of Aboriginal people and their expertise may be critical, such as biodiversity conservation, gender and social equity and nutrition. The Interplay project showed how central Australian expertise can contribute to global sustainability; relationships and commitments from the research may ensure sustainable research processes. This presentation will address how sustainable research can contribute to the wellbeing of Aboriginal people, and support Australia’s progress towards global sustainable development goals.

(Presentation)

Sustaining life and wellbeing: the ethics of suicide prevention research and evaluation

KnowledgeIntersections-JGuenther

KnowledgeIntersections-ETurner

KnowledgeIntersections-BWesley

John Guenther Batchelor Institute

Erin Turner Mental Health Association of Central Australia

Billie-Jo Wesley Mental Health Association of Central Australia

Suicide in Aboriginal communities has long been recognised as a serious concern. In Australia, suicide is the 10th most common reason for death among males, but in the Northern Territory, in many regions it ranks in the top four causes of death. Suicide Story is a suicide prevention and community capacity building program developed specifically with and for remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory. The program content was developed through the teachings and guidance of Aboriginal people and centres on the specificities of Aboriginal protocols and suicide. While the program has run now for more than five years in its current form and some data has been collected during this time, it has not been independently evaluated. MHACA has commissioned an evaluation to assess the program and inform its ongoing development. While the evaluation is still underway and we cannot report on outcomes, the purpose of this paper is to discuss ethical issues associated with evaluations of this kind, drawing from the experience of the evaluation and project team and our analysis of the literature on evaluated suicide prevention programs. We discuss how we have addressed these concerns in this evaluation, with suggestions for other researchers in this field.

(Presentation)

Achieving sustainable outcomes through utilising a collaborative ethnographic approach in remote Indigenous research

KnowledgeIntersections-RBeadle

Rosalind Beadle University of Melbourne

This presentation shows how a collaborative ethnographic approach and participatory action research can produce meaningful and sustainable outcomes in a remote Indigenous context. The study involved cycles of action and reflection by a group of local people within their own project and immersion of the researcher through prolonged engagement. A group of Ngaanyatjarra women in Warburton, WA, initiated, developed and managed a series of activities to address wellbeing in their community. Central to this goal was a school breakfast program focused initially on the kids, but this expanded into a broader catering role and, in addition, mentoring local young girls and women in other communities. This led to the establishment of a worker role that was designed and enacted on the women’s terms and that was meaningful within the social and cultural contexts of their lives. Sustainable outcomes based on: (1) the research practice; (2) targeted activities initiated, developed and managed by the women; and (3), key dimensions of the women’s experience in their worker role, are considered and discussed.

(Presentation)

Embracing multiple outputs from intercultural research projects with a view towards sustainability

KnowledgeIntersections-LisaHall

KnowledgeIntersections-Tarna Andrews

KnowledgeIntersections-Fiona Gibson

Lisa Hall Batchelor Institute

With Linda Anderson, Tarna Andrews, Fiona Gibson, Mona Kantawarra, Barbara Martin, Yamurna Oldfield and Carolyn Windy

The instinct and desire to undertake intercultural research that is ethical and responsible is something that must be taken seriously in doing research work in Central Australia. But what does it look and feel like in practice? Perhaps what we should be aiming for is research work that sustains all participants, both during the work itself and in an ongoing way afterwards. Truly ‘sustainable’ research needs to be responsive to the differing needs of the researchers and participants, to ensure that multiple needs are being met by the project. This paper will explore the development of the publication ‘We Always Stay’. This book was published as a sort of companion piece to a PhD thesis that explored the teacher stories of seven Aboriginal teachers from remote communities in Central Australia. While the focus of the thesis was to explore the supports and barriers for Aboriginal people in becoming qualified teachers, the intention of the book was always to celebrate the stories of the teachers and make these stories available to a wider audience. The book also honours the teachers themselves and provides them with a sense of well-being through the process of having told their story and having an audience listen to that. This paper will be presented by Lisa Hall, a non-Indigenous educator and researcher who undertook the PhD and two of the teacher participants, Linda Anderson and Fiona Gibson, who offered their stories to both the research and the book. Together we will talk about the process of bringing both of these projects to fruition and the interpersonal commitment and collaboration that ensured their success.

(Presentation)


Are university-Industry collaborative projects sustainable in regional towns?

KnowledgeIntersections-DMathur

KnowledgeIntersections-RGerritsen

KnowledgeIntersections-BShanmugam

Deepika Mathur Charles Darwin University

Rolf Gerritsen Charles Darwin University

Bharanidharan Shanmugam Charles Darwin University

Sami Azam Charles Darwin University

For many years university-industry collaboration has been the focus of attention in Australia and internationally. The new Australian Government research funding arrangements are geared towards encouraging researchers to deepen engagement with industry and other end users by working together “to find solutions to real world problems and to create jobs and growth”. This paper uses the example of an Alice Springs-based university-industry collaborative project to argue that the institutional landscape of regional towns is very different from major cities.  It is critical to understand factors that can render such collaborative projects sustainable or unsustainable in regional towns. These factors can vary from the limited number of industry partners in regional towns, the transitory nature of businesses, the need for long term strategic partnerships, to intellectual property rights, timelines of research outcomes and the metrics for measuring the socio-economic impact of the research. The results are significant since most new research funding and initiatives are aimed to increase industry participation in research projects regardless of their location. This can place regional towns’ research projects at a disadvantage.

(Presentation)

Exploring the narratives of Aboriginal school leaders in remote schools to foster Aboriginal educator leadership

KnowledgeIntersections-ZLiddle

Zania Liddle University of New England

The lived experience of Aboriginal school leaders is an under-explored space in the generation of school leadership knowledge for remote contexts.  Exploring stories of leadership collected from Aboriginal practitioners in the field - focusing on the roles and responsibilities of school leaders together with the motivations behind their reasons for taking on a school leader position(s) - generate a narrative that foregrounds authentic themes about the key qualities and elements for effective Aboriginal leadership in remote school contexts.  Understanding of the key qualities and elements of school leadership from the perspectives of Aboriginal practitioners and exploration of the links to Aboriginal knowledge, culture and identity pinpoint what is needed for the next generation of Aboriginal school leaders to emerge.  This presentation explores how the researcher approached using her own stories of remote Aboriginal school leadership along with those of others, and the challenges and benefits of such an approach to generating authentic data of lived experience.

(Presentation)

LANTITE: Neither quality nor equality

KnowledgeIntersections-BVanGelderen

Ben Van Gelderen Charles Darwin University

The new, mandated Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education (LANTITE) for pre-service teachers is a significant obstacle for Indigenous aspirations. Along with many areas of the Northern Territory, remote, central Australian communities have for many decades (Livett, 1988; Marika-Munuŋgiritj et al., 1990 ) been advocating for place-based (Hall, 2014) and ‘bothways’ (Ober & Bat, 2007) teacher training regimes. Both across Australia (Behrendt et al., 2012; MATSITI, 2016) and recent NT government announcements reflect these priorities, acknowledging the ‘effect of more Aboriginal teachers will be better outcomes for the Aboriginal students they teach, and an education workforce more representative’ of the NT (Northern Territory Government, February 7th, 2018). There have been some successes through Batchelor Institute initiatives in the past, and through current programs such as the Catholic Education-Charles Darwin University partnership, Growing Our Own. However, LANTITE is a serious undermining of the key principles which founded these programs and offers a real threat to their sustainability. In the guise of an equality framework, LANTITE will only perpetuate the dire ‘gap’ between the numbers of Indigenous students and teachers in remote communities. Marcus Williams (student) and Ben van Gelderen (lecturer) will critique the current LANTITE in light of their experiences in Growing Our Own.

(Presentation)

Ethics, knowledge making and sustainable research. The story of the Tangentyere Research Hub

KnowledgeIntersections-MCampbell

KnowledgeIntersections-VDavis

KnowledgeIntersections-DFoster

Matthew Campbell Charles Darwin University

Vanessa Davis Tangentyere Council Research Hub

Denise Foster Tangentyere Council Research Hub

Isabelle Waters Tangentyere Council Research Hub

This workshop focuses on exploring the challenges and opportunities that surround working with Aboriginal people as knowledge holders and researchers within projects in which Aboriginal perspectives are sought.  After an introduction that situates the discussion in the context of the experience of the Tangentyere Council Research Hub, participants of the workshop will be facilitated to discuss a) the benefits of working with Aboriginal researchers in Aboriginal research projects, both in terms of knowledge work in a formal sense and in terms of developing capacity around knowledge work that transforms the field over time; b) the challenges of such work for the different groups of participants involved in it; and c) strategies, experiences and ideas that support the addressing, overcoming or avoiding of such challenges.

(Presentation)

Monumental in a Small Town Way

KnowledgeIntersections-JLovell

KnowledgeIntersections-AStrangeways

Judith Lovell Charles Darwin University

Al Strangeways Charles Darwin University

If public art is ‘the placed material objects that are designed to carry the stories of a city’, what happens when the place isn’t a city, the ‘public’ is not a monolithic audience, and for many, the stories carried are not those the art was commissioned to carry?

This session illuminates a public engagement initiative that transformed how some of its audience engaged with a donated public artwork (2010) in Alice Springs. Installing a ‘founding father’-type statue (white man, gun in hand), without the ‘due process’ of the Public Arts Committee could be described as flaunting our region’s love of informality. The researchers subsequent engagement (2017) of a public audience initiated 20 arts-based responses to the man, story, and statue. With sound bites, their images tell of a public engagement initiative linking realist philosophy and arts processes, and a transformation of our understanding of evaluating public engagement initiatives.

(Presentation)

Network Narratives from The Alchemist’s Lab to Monsters and beyond: a story of the potential of ‘global contemporaneity’

KnowledgeIntersections-WTaleo

Wendy Taleo Charles Darwin University

The images and story of this presentation will lead you on a journey to understand how a global, transmedia project in digital material thinking (Rae, 2018) is informing local practice.   This presentation explores how the researcher worked collaboratively to create individual artefacts to be placed in a digital ‘museum’ space called The Alchemist’s Lab.  This created a  ‘choose your own adventure’ narrative which offered adventurers an inviting space to enter and create transformed local meanings that have the capacity to communicate with the local community.  It explores the potential of such a globally created and situated webspace to create a ‘3rd space’  of ‘global contemporaneity’ that supports the needs of locally situated individuals to create context-specific meanings and to share these multiple perspectives and meanings. It concludes with touching on the implications that the use of such transmedia (or media-jumping) modes can have for informing future education technology.

(Presentation)

Okwui Enwezor and the end of modernism: re-positioning Australian Indigenous art in the contemporary art world

KnowledgeIntersections-IBendor

Iris Bendor Central Australian Research Network

Until the end of the 20th century modernism was regarded as a Western phenomenon. The paradigm of contemporary art promoted the end of what Nigerian born curator Okwui Enwezor called Westernism, and instead emphasised the existence of Multiple Modernisms, and their transcultural aspects (McLean, 2016). Enwezor was the Art Director at Documenta 11 (2002), the first Documenta to have a non-European Director. His installation, All the World’s Futures was the central exhibition at the 2015 Venice Biennale. Enwezor emphasised art produced through widespread influences. In Venice, 21 artists were from African descent. This compared to 21 American artists in total in the exhibition. Enwezor also selected artworks by seven Australian artists including a piece by the late Indigenous artist Emily Kame Kngwarreye. The exhibition dealt with complex matters in a multifaceted way. Enwezor was not limited to artists alone in his process to build the installation; he also engaged philosophers, activists and other contributors in his project (Enwezor, 2014). Enwezor is renowned for successfully positioning artists from African countries in the contemporary art arena, and thus provides a possible model for Australian Indigenous art to be likewise positioned. The status of contemporary art from African countries early on, and its current achievements, may be used as a means of understanding aspects of Australian Indigenous art.

(Presentation)

Different places, difference faces: an arts-based approach to understanding resilience in intercultural contexts

KnowledgeIntersections-AStrangewaysLPapatraianou

Lisa Papatraianou Charles Darwin University

Al Strangeways Charles Darwin University

This presentation emerges from a study that aimed to understand the experiences of culturally diverse school students and explore how they consolidate their educational aspirations at the ‘cultural interface’. It identified the challenges and resources they encountered when negotiating different home and school cultures and the impact of resilience on helping them make successful life transitions. In this presentation, we explore the ways in which arts based methods enabled us to work sensitively and ethically in diverse intercultural settings to elicit participants’ ideas and emotions. Intercultural contexts are conceived of in two ways in this presentation. Firstly, we mean the two cultures that the students are moving between as they manage the difference between home and school, and the resilience resources they drew on to navigate the challenges they face. Secondly, we mean the diverse cultural groups of young people whose experiences we hoped to understand: Central Australian Indigenous school students, those with refugee backgrounds, and International students. This presentation focuses on the capacity of art making activities and modes to express potentially sensitive aspects of personal experience and challenge in these settings and with individuals from non-English language backgrounds. We will show the diversity of expression and the depths of experience that the arts can represent. Further, we will demonstrate how the arts enable participants to exercise agency in choosing how much to mask or limit when describing personal experiences which might otherwise open individuals to positions of vulnerability.

(Presentation)

Monsters and Music: mobilizing a DLab approach to develop innovative learning in VET

KnowledgeIntersections-CGilmour

Cain Gilmour Charles Darwin University

This presentation explores how a collaborative Design Lab (DLab) approach can help develop new ways of working in Vocational Education Training (VET).  It describes the process by which the researcher, a VET music lecturer, worked with colleagues and the resources they offered to offer VET music students a learning experience that moved beyond technical, industry-focused training and helped develop creative and innovative thinking skills, skills that industry and society require to be developed by 21st Century learners.  The program developed as a result of a DLab collaboration that built on and developed a collection of resources produced in a Higher Education and research context.  These resources, primarily a collaborative monoprint titled ‘Monstrous Breeches’, but also a cartoon based on this called ‘Different Monsters’ were used to inspire several learning activities where students were asked to reflect on the monsters they saw in the artwork based on their own real-life experience, and then write an audio track that reflected their interpretation of the artwork.  The presentation reflects on the benefits of a DLab collaborative approach to engage lecturers in developing their teaching and reflective practice and open up new ways of thinking and working in the tightly structured VET space.  Such new ways of working are vital to future proof delivery concepts, strengthen VET delivery and sustain VET provision in a rapidly changing teaching landscape.

(Presentation)

Out of the Darkroom and into Cyber Space

KnowledgeIntersections-SDisbray

KnowledgeIntersections-VJohnson

Samantha Disbray Australian National University and CDU

Vivien Johnson University of New South Wales

Charlotte Phillipus Tjupi Arts

The Northern Territory Bilingual Education Program operated in the Pintupi-Luritja region of Central Australia from 1978 to 2006. A Literature Production Centre at Papunya school was established to provide resources for the program. Over the years, dedicated Aboriginal literacy workers, illustrators, storytellers, elders and linguists combined their talents with printers, production managers and teacher-linguists in the creation of over 500 books, many newsletters and photographs, and stories and events captured on audio and video tapes. The material was systematically stored, manuscripts and masters, recorded voices and hand-drawn illustrations, alongside printed final products. The Bilingual Program closed in 2006 and most of the materials were boxed up and with five crowded filing cabinets, padlocked in the old darkroom of the Literature Production Centre. Our paper tells the story of this ambitious and creative undertaking, and the steps now being taken to bring this collection out the darkroom and into the digital era, providing local and global access and conservation for the future. The story is interwoven with another great story from Papunya school, birthplace of the contemporary Indigenous Art movement, as the two are intimately linked. We explore the multifaceted significance of the collection locally and nationally, and its contribution to art, literature, language, education and history.

(Presentation)

Sustainable environment-health impact research in regional and remote towns

Supriya Mathew Charles Darwin University

Extreme and poor environmental conditions such as extreme heat and poor air quality affect the health of people in both urban and remote areas. Majority of the studies that explore the impact of extreme weather or poor air quality rely on data from ground based monitoring stations and primary health data from hospitals. Primary health data usually in the form of ambulance call outs, emergency department presentations, hospital admissions usually only represent severe cases. A proportion of the community affected may be attending clinics of have just been affected mildly or are less verbal to their symptoms are not included. In remote towns, there is also usually very low resolution of ground based air quality or temperature monitoring systems. For instance, the nearest weather station for Alice Springs, which has a population close to 25,000 is almost 10km away from the town centre. Air quality monitoring is not conducted for Alice Springs. Increasing the resolution of ground based monitoring systems may not be cost effective for sparsely distributed remote and regional locations. Moreover, individual exposure to temperature vary with location, behavioural factors, household conditions and health conditions. This paper will focus on research required to promote on-going responses by community to mitigate the health risks due to extreme heat and air quality in Alice Springs. 

(Presentation)

  • Call us
  • Email us
  • Like us on Facebook
  • Follow us on Twitter